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  • Switchgear now includes a joystick for menu navigation.
    Switchgear now includes a joystick for menu navigation.
  • Signature twin-pod headlamps remain.
    Signature twin-pod headlamps remain.
  • Instrumentation fully digital with customisable views and...
    Instrumentation fully digital with customisable views and an adjustable screen angle.
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2017 Triumph Street Triple range revealed

3rd Feb 2017 8:00 am

New Street Triple range unveiled in London; phased global release likely to include India this year.

Triumph has taken the wraps off its new Street Triple family at an event held in London in January. The highlights of the new bikes include a larger 765cc engine that puts out more power and torque, a new ride-by-wire system with up to five riding modes, a new specification chassis, a chiselled, sharper styling and a fully digital 5.0-inch colour TFT instrument panel. The Street Triple is available in three variants: S, R and RS.

The 12-valve, liquid-cooled, three-cylinder, in-line, DOHC engine is based on the Daytona 675’s unit with an increased bore and stroke and 80 new parts that include a new crank, balancer shaft, con-rods and pistons. The engine is offered in three states of tune: on the Street Triple S, it puts out 113hp at 11,250rpm, on the faster ‘R’ it makes 118hp at 12,000rpm, and  on the super-hot ‘RS’ it pumps out 123hp at 11,700rpm. There is also a larger air box and a new exhaust system tuned for more power and a better soundtrack too.

The rest of the powertrain also receives improvements. There’s a slipper clutch now to reduce wheel hop under heavy engine braking, the gearbox geometry has been revised for smoother cog swapping and the first and second gears have shorter ratios for improved acceleration. The RS version also gets a quick-shifter as standard which allows for quicker clutchless upshifts. The shifter is also available on the ‘S’ and ‘R’ variants as an accessory.  

Keeping things in check is a ride-by-wire system that has five riding modes for conditions like rain, track, road, etc. While all modes offer full engine power, they influence the throttle response, traction control and the ABS settings. The ABS is also independently adjustable in three ways. On the ‘R’ and ‘RS’, the modes are linked to individual styles on the digital display which offers customisable views and is controlled by a five-way joystick. The ‘S’, however, misses out on the digital instrumentation and instead gets an updated analogue tacho and digital speedo unit. There is a new gullwing design, aluminium swingarm that has increased torsional stiffness and, according to Triumph, has improved the bike’s high-speed stability.

Style-wise, the new bikes have sharper and more aggressive cues with a ‘nose-down’ posture influenced by the new-generation Speed Triples. The signature twin-pod headlamps now have LED lighting for the position lights and DRLs.

Apart from these three main variants, the Street Triple family also includes two special models – a ‘low ride height’ version based on the ‘R’ which has its own suspension and seating setup, making it 30mm lower than standard, and an A2 licence version based on the ‘S’ with a smaller 660cc engine for riders in Europe and other markets where licence restrictions apply based on a bike’s power.

The Street Triple is not Triumph’s largest selling model line in India, but it is quite successful and the new bikes will likely head to our shores later this year as CBUs. For India, however, expect the three main variants only.

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