Triumph Tiger 1200 unveiled

    The Tiger 1200 is based on a brand new platform and is aimed directly at the BMW R 1250 GS.

    Published On Dec 07, 2021 05:30:00 PM

    16,790 Views

    Triumph has finally unveiled its new-generation Tiger 1200 and there’s a lot to unpack.

    • Two model ranges, two fuel tank sizes

    • Aimed at the BMW R 1250 GS

    • Gets new 150hp, 1,160cc three-cylinder engine

    The new Tiger 1200 will be offered in two model ranges – the road-biased GT and off-road focused Rally ranges. Additionally, both styles can be had as ‘Explorer’ models, which come with a larger 30-litre fuel tank, against the standard 20-litre tank. There are five variants in total – GT, GT Pro, GT Explorer, Rally Pro and Rally Explorer. 

    Triumph Tiger 1200: new engine

    The headline details are that this is a complete ground-up transformation for the Tiger 1200, with the bike now following the formula that was first seen with the new Tiger 900. This includes a new T-Plane firing order for the 1,160cc three-cylinder engine. This motor’s bore and stroke figures are identical to the new Speed Triple, but Triumph says that this is a completely different engine. It now produces 150hp and 130Nm, which is nine more horsepower than before. Compared to the BMW, the Triumph makes 14hp more, but torque is lower by 13Nm. Like the Tiger 900, this engine uses twin, side-mounted radiators. 

    Triumph Tiger 1200: new chassis

    The bike uses a brand new chassis that weighs 5.5kg lesser than before. The Tiger 1200 no longer has a single-sided swingarm, but its new ‘tri-link’ swingarm and shaft drive setup help save 1.5kg. Weight saving has been the primary target and to that extent, even the fuel tanks are now made out of aluminium. Triumph says that this bike is over 25kg lighter than its predecessor. Moreover, the base GT now weighs in at 240kg, which is 9kg lighter than the equivalent R 1250 GS. 

    The whole bike has been designed to be slimmer and this can also be seen in the exhaust that sits close to the bike. The seat height is adjustable on both models, ranging from 850-870mm on the GT and 875-895mm on the Rally. That’s very tall, but Triumph claims that the slimmer bike means the reach for a rider’s leg to the ground is now easier. An optional 20mm lower seat is available.

    Tiger
    Triumph Tiger 1200 GT Explorer

    All the models now get electronically-controlled Showa semi-active suspension as standard. This system allows nine levels of damping adjustment between Comfort and Sport, and also allows the rider to electronically set the spring preload. 

    On the GT model range, the suspension travel is set at 200mm at both ends, while this increases to 220mm for the Rally models. The GT runs on alloy wheels spanning 19-inches at the front and 18-inches at the back and runs on Metzeler Tourance tyres. The Rally, meanwhile, is on a 21-inch/18-inch tubeless spoked wheel combination and uses Metzeler Karoo Street tyres. For those who want more aggressive tyres, Triumph has approved the Michelin Anakee Wild tyre for use on the Rally.

    Braking is handled by Brembo Stylema calipers clamping down on twin 320mm rotors. The Tiger 1200 uses Magura radial master cylinders for its front brake and clutch.

    Triumph Tiger 1200: design and features

    The design is reminiscent of the Tiger 900s and the new windscreen is designed to be adjustable by one hand. The handlebar is now 20mm wider than before and the Explorer’s handlebars will be 16mm higher. Triumph claims better wind protection than the earlier model, less engine heat to be felt by the rider and more spacious seats.

    As far as features go, the Tiger 1200s are brimming with tech. The Explorer models get a standard fit radar system from Continental that offers a blind spot and lane change warning system. This was something the Ducati Multistrada V4 debuted, but unlike the Triumph, the Ducati also has a forward-facing radar that enables adaptive cruise control.

    Tiger2
    Triumph Tiger 1200 Rally Explorer

    A new 7-inch TFT display comes with MyTriumph connectivity, which brings in audio and GoPro control. Full LED lighting is standard and all models from the GT Pro onwards, get lean sensitive cornering lights. There are up to six riding modes based on the variant, with the base GT getting three – Rain, Road (cuts power to 100hp) and Sport. 

    Cornering ABS and traction control are standard while all models upwards of the GT Pro get an up/down quickshifter, hill hold, cruise control, heated grips and a centre stand. In addition, the Explorer models get a tyre-pressure monitoring system and heated rider and pillion seats. All models get a keyless start system, which works on the steering lock as well as the fuel tank lid.

    Tiger3
    Triumph Tiger 1200 Rally Pro

    As for accessories, there are over 50 options, with the luggage options designed in conjunction with Givi. Triumph has also forged a new partnership with Sena for Bluetooth communicators. The bikes finally come with a 3-year, unlimited mileage warranty and a 16,000km service interval.

    Triumph Tiger 1200: prices and India launch

    Prices in the UK start at £14,600 and range up to £19,100. This places the bike more or less on par with the equivalent BMW 1250 GS, if a little more affordable in some models. We expect the Tiger 1200 to launch in India sometime next year. Prices will depend on what models Triumph decides to bring here, but expect ex-showroom prices to start at around the Rs 19-20 lakh mark.

    Copyright (c) Autocar India. All rights reserved.

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