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Triumph Daytona Moto2 765 limited-edition breaks cover

24th Aug 2019 3:18 pm

The limited-edition Triumph Daytona Moto2 765 uses full carbon fibre bodywork to save weight and is the most powerful Daytona made till date.

Triumph has brought back the Daytona, but this time around it’s called the Daytona Moto2 765 limited edition. As the name suggests, it’s a road-legal limited-run model (just 1,530 units in total) that takes inspiration from the brand’s Moto2 race bike. While it does look similar to the 675 – it even uses the same frame – there are a lot of changes that make it even more track-focused.

The fully-faired supersport is powered by a ‘Moto2-derived’ engine that makes 130hp at 12,250rpm and 80Nm at 9,750rpm. Not only does the 765cc triple make higher figures on this model as compared to the Street Triple RS, but it also does it at a higher rpm. The stronger pistons, new cam profiles, increased compression ratio, among other changes, has allowed for the redline to also increase to 13,250rpm.

What’s more is that the bike also comes fitted with a Moto2-inspired titanium exhaust system and a new gearbox with ‘track optimised’ gear ratios. 

The new Daytona also uses top-spec Brembo Stylema brakes and fully-adjustable suspension by Ohlins. Triumph also says that the main frame and swingarm are lighter as they have been anodised instead of being powder-coated. The shortened bolts also save a few more grams. However, the biggest weight-saving is said to have come from the full carbon fibre bodywork. The electronics package consists of five riding modes, all of which are adjustable. 

At GBP 15,765 (about Rs 13.90 lakh), the Daytona is as expensive as some Japanese litre-class superbikes, but it makes up for it with its top-drawer equipment. 

This has not been a typical new model effort from Triumph. Instead this bike was a special project built by a small team within the company. As the visual elements and the base frame remain the same, it could suggest that this might be the last of the Daytonas as we know of them. We hope that’s not the case, but if so, this bike makes for a fantastic last hurrah. It isn’t clear at the moment whether any units of the bike will make it to India.

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